From today’s reading in Tyndale’s One Year Chronological Bible dated 1/20:

Today Eliphaz continues with more words of discouragement to Job. Eliphaz wrongly believes that Job’s suffering is directly related to his sin. He says to Job, “For wrath kills a foolish man, and envy slays a simple one. I have seen the foolish taking root.” Eliphaz is trying to reason Job’s suffering based on his own understanding and what he has seen. Then he says to Job, “Behold, happy is the man whom God corrects; Therefore do not despise the chastening of the Almighty.”

Eliphaz, who lacks understanding of the spiritual world, inflicts more pain on the already suffering Job by giving him terrible counsel. Therefore, Job responds, “To him who is afflicted, kindness should be shown by his friends…But what does your arguing prove?” Job is discovering that his friends can not provide the release from his pain that he is seeking. 

Not all suffering is directly related to our own personal sin, as we see here with Job. There is always way more going on behind the scenes that our finite minds cannot interpret. Although Eliphaz is speaking the truth — God does correct His children (Hebrews 12:10-11) — this truth is not helpful to suffering Job. 

Sometimes it is hard to understand God’s good plans and purposes for us in the midst of our suffering, but it doesn’t mean that He is not working for our good and His glory. However, Job can’t see that right now. So Job cries out to the Lord desiring death over pain – “So that my soul chooses strangling and death rather than my body. I loathe my life; I would not live forever. Let me alone, for my days are but a breath.” 

Job doesn’t know that his afflictions are from Satan and that the Lord is allowing it to accomplish His higher purposes. Job will have to trust God in the midst of his pain and wait on the Lord to act on his behalf. And He will! So keep reading. (Job 5:1-7:21)

From today’s reading in Tyndale’s One Year Chronological Bible dated 1/19:

“The account of Job is traditionally thought to have taken place around the time of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob (2200-1800 BC), or shortly thereafter. However, it could have occurred as late as the Exile (during the sixth century BC)” –  Note from the OYCB. 

The story of Job answers several questions:

1) Can bad things happen to good people? Yes

2) Is God capable of doing evil? No

3) Is Satan the real enemy? Yes

4) Does God allow evil to accomplish His purposes and for His glory? Yes

5) Can the enemy only do what God allows? Yes

6) Is walking with the Lord always easy? No

7) Will it be worth it in the end? Yes

“There was a man in the land of Uz, whose name was Job; and that man was blameless and upright, and one who feared God and shunned evil.” Also, he is a man of great possessions. From the very beginning of the story of Job, we see that Job is a righteous man as he comes to the Lord His way, by interceding for his children through substitutionary atonement – “he would rise early in the morning and offer burnt offerings according to the number of them all. For Job said, ‘It may be that my sons have sinned and cursed God in their hearts.’ Thus Job did regularly.” However, we also see a conversation taking place in the heavenly realm of which Job is unaware. God allows Job to be tested by Satan and just like that, Job loses everything: his children, servants, all his possessions, and he is covered in painful boils. But God puts a limit on what Satan can do to him – Satan cannot take Job’s life.

Job’s suffering is so great that his own wife says to him, “Curse God and die.” However, Job responds, “‘You speak as one of the foolish women speaks. Shall we indeed accept good from God, and shall we not accept adversity?’ In all this Job did not sin with his lips.” 

Then Job’s three friends, Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar, come to Job with good intentions of comforting him. However, their words end up bringing discouragement rather than encouragement because they try to rationalize Job’s pain. Job’s friends wrongly believe that Job’s suffering is directly related to his sinful actions. Since Job’s friends are clueless about what is going on behind the scenes in the spiritual realm, they will spend the remainder of their time with Job trying to convince him of this false truth. 

Therefore, we will have to bear along with Job listening to his discouraging friends for the next several days. But in the end, the Lord is going to appear and shed some light on Job’s situation, so keep reading! (Job 1:1-4:21)

From today’s reading in Tyndale’s One Year Chronological Bible dated 1/18:

Jacob is at the end of his life, having lived in Egypt seventeen years, when Joseph brings his boys to his bedside for a blessing. Jacob tells Joseph, “God Almighty appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan and blessed me, and said to me, ‘Behold, I will make you fruitful and multiply you, and I will make of you a multitude of people, and give this land to your descendants after you as an everlasting possession.’ And now your two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, who were born to you in the land of Egypt before I came to you in Egypt, are mine.” Then Jacob blesses the younger brother, Ephraim, over the older brother, Manasseh, saying that the younger shall become greater than the older. Joseph tries to get his father to bless the older one instead, but Jacob is adamant about his blessing. Although blessing the younger brother above the older brother would not have been the cultural norm, we have already seen with the story of Esau and Jacob that God’s plans often differ from the current culture. 

After blessing Joseph’s sons, Jacob blesses his own sons. Pay special attention to Judah’s blessing in Genesis 49:10 – “The scepter shall not depart from Judah, nor a lawgiver from between his feet, until Shiloh comes; and to Him shall be the obedience of the people.” This blessing is a prophecy that the Messiah, the One God promised to send back in the garden (Genesis 3:15), will come through Judah’s descendants. In the Kingdom Era, the Lord makes a promise to King David, a descendant of Judah, that his throne shall be established forever pointing to the ultimate King, Jesus Christ, who is coming through this lineage. 

Before Jacob dies, he commands his sons to bury him in the cave Abraham bought in the land of Canaan where Abraham, Sarah, Isaac, Rebekah, and Leah are buried. “So the sons did for him just as he had commanded them. For his sons carried him to the land of Canaan, and buried him in the cave.” 

Now that Jacob is dead, the brothers begin to worry that Joseph is going to take revenge on them. However, Joseph assures them by saying, “Do not be afraid, for am I in the place of God? But as for you, you meant evil against me; but God meant it for good, in order to bring it about as it is this day, to save many people alive.” 

That is God – He turns evil into good! 

We end the reading with Joseph making the Israelites swear to take his bones with them when they leave Egypt. Then Joseph, at one hundred and ten years old, dies.

Soon we will enter the Exodus Era, but not before reading the book of Job. Tomorrow we meet Job, so keep reading! (Genesis 47:28-50:26)

From today’s reading in Tyndale’s One Year Chronological Bible dated 1/18:

Jacob is at the end of his life, having lived in Egypt seventeen years, when Joseph brings his boys to his bedside for a blessing. Jacob tells Joseph, “God Almighty appeared to me at Luz in the land of Canaan and blessed me, and said to me, ‘Behold, I will make you fruitful and multiply you, and I will make of you a multitude of people, and give this land to your descendants after you as an everlasting possession.’ And now your two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, who were born to you in the land of Egypt before I came to you in Egypt, are mine.” Then Jacob blesses the younger brother, Ephraim, over the older brother, Manasseh, saying that the younger shall become greater than the older. Joseph tries to get his father to bless the older one instead, but Jacob is adamant about his blessing. Although blessing the younger brother above the older brother would not have been the cultural norm, we have already seen with the story of Esau and Jacob that God’s plans often differ from the current culture. 

After blessing Joseph’s sons, Jacob blesses his own sons. Pay special attention to Judah’s blessing in Genesis 49:10 – “The scepter shall not depart from Judah, nor a lawgiver from between his feet, until Shiloh comes; and to Him shall be the obedience of the people.” This blessing is a prophecy that the Messiah, the One God promised to send back in the garden (Genesis 3:15), will come through Judah’s descendants. In the Kingdom Era, the Lord makes a promise to King David, a descendant of Judah, that his throne shall be established forever pointing to the ultimate King, Jesus Christ, who is coming through this lineage. 

Before Jacob dies, he commands his sons to bury him in the cave Abraham bought in the land of Canaan where Abraham, Sarah, Isaac, Rebekah, and Leah are buried. “So the sons did for him just as he had commanded them. For his sons carried him to the land of Canaan, and buried him in the cave.” 

Now that Jacob is dead, the brothers begin to worry that Joseph is going to take revenge on them. However, Joseph assures them by saying, “Do not be afraid, for am I in the place of God? But as for you, you meant evil against me; but God meant it for good, in order to bring it about as it is this day, to save many people alive.” 

That is God – He turns evil into good! 

We end the reading with Joseph making the Israelites swear to take his bones with them when they leave Egypt. Then Joseph, at one hundred and ten years old, dies.

Soon will enter the Exodus Era, but not before reading the book of Job. Tomorrow we meet Job, so keep reading! (Genesis 47:28-50:26)

From today’s reading in Tyndale’s One Year Chronological Bible dated 1/17:

When Pharaoh hears that Joseph’s brothers have come to Egypt, he is pleased and says to Joseph, “Bring your father and your households and come to me; I will give you the best of the land of Egypt, and you will eat the fat of the land.” So the brothers return to Canaan to retrieve their families. When they tell Jacob that Joseph is alive, “the spirit of Jacob their father revived. Then Israel said, ‘It is enough. Joseph my son is still alive. I will go and see him before I die.’”

On the journey to Egypt, Jacob stops at Beersheba to offer sacrifices to the Lord. God speaks to Jacob saying, “do not fear to go down to Egypt, for I will make of you a great nation there. I will go down with you to Egypt, and I will also surely bring you up again.” The Lord is going to hold true to this promise, but it isn’t going to be a quick and easy process. So Jacob’s entire family, a total of seventy direct descendants not counting their wives who were with them, move to Egypt. 

Joseph instructs his brothers to tell Pharaoh that they are shepherds “that you may dwell in the land of Goshen; for every shepherd is an abomination to the Egyptians.” The brothers do as told, and Pharaoh gives them the fertile land in Goshen. However, this is not the promised land. Paul Benware explains in the “Survey of the Old Testament” that the land of Canaan was the womb where the Israelites were born, and Egypt was their incubator that protected them physically from attacks by other kings and morally from the perverse Canaanite people. Benware also noted that Egypt protected the Israelites’ racial purity as the Egyptians would not intermarry with them because of their occupation as shepherds. So we can see that God is still behind the scenes working His plan to build a great nation from Abraham’s descendants. 

We end the reading with Joseph’s family settling in Goshen, “and they had possessions there and grew and multiplied exceedingly.” Will the Israelites growth threaten the Egyptians? Keep reading to find out. (Genesis 45:16-47:27)

From today’s reading in Tyndale’s One Year Chronological Bible dated 1/16:

Food is scarce in the land, so Jacob sends all of his sons except Benjamin, Joseph’s younger brother by Rachel, to Egypt to buy grain. When Jacob’s sons arrive in Egypt, they are brought before Joseph. No one recognizes Joseph, and the brothers bow down before him, bringing to fruition the dream Joseph had many years ago. Joseph immediately recognizes his brothers, but he keeps his identity hidden as he questions them about their family. Then Joseph asks them to go and get their youngest brother, Benjamin, while leaving one of them, Simeon, in prison in Egypt until the brothers return with Benjamin.

When the brothers go back to Canaan and tell Jacob all that happened, Jacob refuses to send his beloved Benjamin to Egypt until Judah eventually steps in and says, “I myself will be surety for him.” Remember that it was Judah’s idea to take away Joseph’s life by selling him as a slave. And now, Judah is the one offering to take responsibility for Benjamin’s life. Judah knows what it is like to lose two sons and has compassion for his father, who already believes that one of his sons is dead. The Lord uses all the pain and chaos in Judah’s life to mature him into a man who is now willing to lay down his own life so his dad doesn’t have to bear the loss of another son, and to save his family from starvation.

So the brothers return to Egypt with Benjamin and bow down before Joseph again, as predicted in the earlier dreams. While Judah is pleading for Benjamin’s life in exchange for his own, Joseph can’t take it any longer. He weeps loudly and tells his brothers “I am Joseph your brother, whom you sold into Egypt. But now, do not therefore be grieved or angry with yourselves because you sold me here; for God sent me before you to preserve life. For these two years the famine has been in the land, and there are still five years in which there will be neither plowing nor harvesting. And God sent me before you to preserve a posterity for you in the earth, and to save your lives by a great deliverance. So now it was not you who sent me here, but God.” 

How is Joseph able to endure all that hardship?! He trusts the Lord, knowing that God’s plans aren’t always easy but they are always good! However, God’s definition of good isn’t the same as the world’s. Keep reading because tomorrow Jacob’s family moves to Egypt. (Genesis 42:1-45:15)

From today’s reading in Tyndale’s One Year Chronological Bible dated 1/15:

Joseph was sold by his brothers, sent to a foreign land, imprisoned for a crime he didn’t commit, and his grandfather Isaac dies without knowing that Joseph is still alive. As harsh as Joseph’s life appears, it is always too soon to assess someone’s situation because the Lord is always at work behind the scenes. We see God working on Joseph’s behalf when He gives Joseph the ability to interpret the dreams of two prisoners, Pharaoh’s cupbearer (or butler) and baker. Joseph gives all the credit for the interpretations to the Lord when he says, “Do not interpretations belong to God?” One thing about Joseph is that his life always points others to the Lord.

So the Lord’s interpretations of the dreams, that the cupbearer would be restored to his previous position and that the baker would be killed, come true. However, the cupbearer forgets about Joseph once he is released from prison. But God has not forgotten Joseph! In the Lord’s perfect timing, two years later, He brings Joseph out of prison and gives him insight regarding Pharaoh’s dreams. Joseph says to Pharaoh, “God has shown Pharaoh what He is about to do. Indeed seven years of great plenty will come throughout all the land of Egypt; but after them seven years of famine will arise, and all the plenty will be forgotten in the land of Egypt; and the famine will deplete the land.” Then Joseph advises Pharaoh to store up food during the years of plenty. Pharaoh recognizes that God is with Joseph and that there is no other man as wise Joseph. Therefore, Joseph is promoted as ruler over Pharaoh’s house and all of Egypt. 

This is a drastic change in Joseph’s circumstances. Joseph was seventeen years old when he was sold by his brothers as a slave, and now he is a thirty year old man, ruler of Egypt, and married to Asenath. Joseph and Asenath have two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim. Joseph is appointed by the Lord to carry out His plan to save the nations from a great famine. Keep reading because a family reunion is coming up next! (Genesis 40:1-23, Genesis 35:28-29, Genesis 41:1-57)

From today’s reading in Tyndale’s One Year Chronological Bible dated 1/14:

Joseph, Rachel’s oldest son, is Jacob’s favorite child, which is made obvious by the tunic of many colors Jacob made for him. This favoritism does not sit well with Joseph’s brothers. So when seventeen year-old Joseph receives dreams from the Lord revealing that one day he will rule over his family, the brothers become furious. They even plot Joseph’s death when Jacob sends him out to the fields to check on them. But Reuben, Jacob’s oldest son with Leah, talks the brothers into dropping Joseph into a well instead of killing him, with the intent of secretly rescuing him later. However, Judah says why kill Joseph when we can profit from him. So they sell Joseph to traders passing by, and they cover his tunic of many colors in animal blood to stage his death to their father Jacob. And Jacob believes the lie. Take note of whose idea it was to profit from Joseph’s life – Judah. Soon in the story, Jacob is going to prophesy that the Messiah will come through Judah’s descendants (Genesis 49:10). However, Judah is on a faith journey like the rest of us and his story has a messy start. 

Judah marries a Canaanite woman, and they have three sons. The first son, Er, marries Tamar, but God kills Er due to his wickedness. So in accordance with levirate marriages, Judah marries his second son, Onan, to his brother’s widow, Tamar. But Onan “emitted on the ground, lest he should give an heir to his brother.” God finds this to be wicked and kills him too. Judah blames Tamar for his sons’ deaths so he withholds the third son. But Tamar has an idea! She disguises herself as a harlot and next thing you know, Judah sleeps with Tamar. She becomes pregnant, and they have twins, Perez and Zerah. King David and ultimately our Savior Jesus Christ will come from Pérez’ lineage. The more we get into the story, the more we will see that there is no perfect person in Jesus’ family tree. They are all in need of a Savior! 

In Egypt, Joseph is sold to Potiphar, an officer of Pharaoh and captain of the guard. Potiphar’s wife tries to seduce Joseph. However Joseph flees, leaving his cloak behind. Potiphar’s wife lies, saying that Joseph attacks her, and innocent Joseph is sent to jail. Joseph’s circumstances appear very bleak. But God is with him! Keep reading to see how the Lord grows Judah, elevates Joseph, and saves the nations! (Genesis 37:1-38:30, 1 Chronicles 2:3-6, 8, Genesis 39:1-23)

From today’s reading in Tyndale’s One Year Chronological Bible dated 1/13:

Today we see a second example of great possessions causing family separation; first Abraham and Lot; now Jacob and Esau. Esau married a Canaanite woman “and went to a country away from the presence of his brother Jacob. For their possessions were too great for them to dwell together, and the land where they were strangers could not support them because of their livestock. So Esau dwelt in Mount Seir. Esau is Edom.” 

Remember the origin of the Canaanites? Ham’s cursed son Canaan. The Lord will warn the children of Israel not to intermarry with the Canaanites because it will lead them away from the Lord and into idolatry. We saw this in the beginning of the story when Seth’s descendants began to intermarry with Cain’s descendants who were not walking with the Lord. Over time the hearts and minds of everyone became so wicked that God destroyed the earth by flood. God’s instructions for His people are always for their good!

From the genealogy list, we discover that Edom (Esau’s descendants) has kings before the Israelites (Jacob’s descendants). God’s desire since the garden has always been for his people to trust Him and walk by faith. However, later in the story, the Israelites will make a decision based on sight and not faith. Instead of trusting the Lord, they ask for a king to rule over them like the nations around them. 

We also learned today that King Amalek is a descendant of Esau. The Amalekites become notorious for attacking the people of Israel. As a result, God will tell the Israelites to wipe the Amalekites off the face of the earth; but will the Israelites obey? We will find out down the road. Keep reading because tomorrow we get a peek into the lives of two of Jacob’s sons, Joseph and Judah. (Genesis 36:1-19, 1 Chronicles 1:35-37, Genesis 36:20-30, 1 Chronicles 1:38-42, Genesis 36:31-43, 1 Chronicles 1:43-2:2)

From today’s reading in Tyndale’s One Year Chronological Bible dated 1/12:

Today Jacob wrestles with his faith, spiritually and physically. As he gets closer to Esau, Jacob prays for the Lord’s protection. However, Jacob still tries to manipulate the situation by sending gifts to Esau to win his favor before they meet face to face saying, “I will appease him with the present that goes before me, and afterward I will see his face, perhaps he will accept me.”

“Then Jacob was left alone; and a Man wrestled with him until the breaking of day. Now when He saw that He did not prevail against him, He touched the socket of his hip; and the socket of Jacob’s hip was out of joint as He wrestled with him.” But Jacob refuses to let go of the Lord, and the Lord blesses Jacob and gives him a new name – “Your name shall no longer be Jacob, but Israel.” 

When Jacob (Israel) encounters Esau, Esau “ran to meet him, and embraced him, and fell on his neck and kissed him, and they wept.” After the reconciliation they part ways, and “Jacob came safely to the city of Shechem, which is in the land of Canaan.” But here the story takes a dark turn. 

Jacob’s daughter, Dinah, is raped by Shechem, the son of a Hivite prince. And her brothers, Simeon and Levi, take revenge on the whole town by killing all the males including Shechem and his father. So the Lord tells Jacob to “Arise, go to Bethel and dwell there; and make an altar there to God, who appeared to you when you fled from the face of Esau your brother.” But before they leave, Jacob has to tell his household to put away the foreign gods so he can go and worship the Lord “who answered me in the day of my distress and has been with me in the way which I have gone.” 

Throughout the story we will see more and more how God’s chosen people struggle with sin and idolatry, but God is patient and faithful to his messy, broken people. Nothing will stop the Lord from providing a way for our salvation! So Jacob moves to Bethel and builds an altar to the Lord. Then the Lord confirms all the previous promises He made to Jacob by telling him that nations and kings will come from him and that He will give him the land of Canaan. 

We end the reading with the death of Rachel while birthing her second son, Benjamin. Jacob has a special place in his heart for Rachel’s two sons, Joseph and Benjamin. Will this favoritism cause family problems? Keep reading to find out. (Genesis 32:1-35:27)